Law prosecution – Prosecute Bush Cheney http://prosecutebushcheney.org/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 22:43:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://prosecutebushcheney.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Law prosecution – Prosecute Bush Cheney http://prosecutebushcheney.org/ 32 32 Coaches oppose lawsuits against gangs https://prosecutebushcheney.org/coaches-oppose-lawsuits-against-gangs/ https://prosecutebushcheney.org/coaches-oppose-lawsuits-against-gangs/#respond Thu, 17 Oct 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://prosecutebushcheney.org/coaches-oppose-lawsuits-against-gangs/ BOSTON – Lawyers for former college coaches, a former college athletics official and other defendants said their clients had no relationship or knowledge of each other’s actions in a vast criminal company led by Rick Singer. Their arguments came in a series of motions filed this week calling for the dismissal of racketeering charges in […]]]>


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Family Law, Lawsuits Diversify Practice – Minnesota Lawyer https://prosecutebushcheney.org/family-law-lawsuits-diversify-practice-minnesota-lawyer/ https://prosecutebushcheney.org/family-law-lawsuits-diversify-practice-minnesota-lawyer/#respond Thu, 23 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://prosecutebushcheney.org/family-law-lawsuits-diversify-practice-minnesota-lawyer/ Last name: Ryan bies Title: Shareholder, Dougherty, Molenda, Solfest, Hills & Bauer Education: BA, biology, Luther College; JD, University of Saint-Thomas Ryan Bies, shareholder of Dougherty, Molenda, Solfest, Hills & Bauer in Apple Valley, benefits from a diverse practice that encompasses the practice of family law and his work as a deputy municipal lawyer in […]]]>

Last name: Ryan bies

Title: Shareholder, Dougherty, Molenda, Solfest, Hills & Bauer

Education: BA, biology, Luther College; JD, University of Saint-Thomas

Ryan Bies, shareholder of Dougherty, Molenda, Solfest, Hills & Bauer in Apple Valley, benefits from a diverse practice that encompasses the practice of family law and his work as a deputy municipal lawyer in several southern metropolitan municipalities.

Family law is often emotional, cases can last over a year, and a lot of time is spent counseling clients and discussing how to resolve issues, Bies said.

In criminal proceedings, meanwhile, emotions are a bigger issue for the accused, usually resolve faster, and Bies largely decides how to handle the cases himself. He is one of the firm’s many family lawyers who also serve as prosecutors.

“I wanted to work in a very diverse field, and family law certainly has it,” Bies said. “I am comfortable with a lot of variety. So maybe doing something that doesn’t have a lot of overlap, like criminal prosecution, allows me to be a little more adept at handling this.

Q. What’s the best way to start a conversation with you?

A. I’m an introvert, so the easiest way to start a conversation is to start talking about something I’m interested in, like fly fishing or soccer. I also like to talk to people about things they are passionate about.

Q. What prompted you to study law and pursue it professionally?

A. I had been out of college for about three or two and a half years and was not happy to work in the sale of medical products. I always felt I was going to go back to school but I was looking for which degree would give me a lot of leeway. I finally decided that a law degree would open a lot of different doors. I wasn’t sure exactly what I wanted to do with my law degree, but I figured getting a law degree would be the best way to keep my options open.

Q. What books are on your bedside table or your e-reader?

A. I’m going to read “A Death in Eden” by Keith McCafferty. He’s writing a series about a private investigator in the Madison River Valley in Montana, where I fly fishing. I also like future science fiction books. I also just finished “Split Second”, a science fiction novel.

Q. Who is your pet peeve?

A. I really don’t like it when people drive slowly in the left lane. It’s common around here.

Q. What are your favorite aspects of being a lawyer?

A. I like helping people solve problems. I have always been a problem solver.

Q. The least favorite?

A. My least favorite is when other lawyers try to make things personal between lawyers. It doesn’t happen often, but it does, and I don’t like that part of the job.

Q. What is your favorite activity outside of your job?

A. I like fly fishing. I like to attend sporting events. My favorite thing to do is probably ride a bike with the kids and go down to a park or take them camping in one of the parks where you can hike.

Q. If someone visits you in your hometown, what would you take them to see or do?

A. I should probably take them to Falls Park. There is a lot to do in Sioux Falls, but that’s probably the only thing if you go there once you should go see Falls Park. There are a lot more small businesses around downtown and leading up to Falls Park now.

Q. What misconceptions do people have about working as a lawyer?

A. The biggest misconception that I come across with my friends, family and acquaintances is that a lot of them think the law is really black and white, when there is a lot more gray than people who don’t work in the legal profession don’t realize it. There are a lot of nuances to this, and sometimes there aren’t a lot of really clear answers. I like the gray area. If everything was black and white, people wouldn’t need avocados, so it’s good to have gray.

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Wildlife law enforcement agencies gain prosecution skills for wildlife law https://prosecutebushcheney.org/wildlife-law-enforcement-agencies-gain-prosecution-skills-for-wildlife-law/ https://prosecutebushcheney.org/wildlife-law-enforcement-agencies-gain-prosecution-skills-for-wildlife-law/#respond Tue, 15 Nov 2016 08:00:00 +0000 https://prosecutebushcheney.org/wildlife-law-enforcement-agencies-gain-prosecution-skills-for-wildlife-law/ A male dog from the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) on November 30, 2009 sniffs some of the ivory and skins of wild animals he helped seize from poachers across the country during a press briefing at the KWS headquarters in Nairobi. The KWS, the Lusaka Accord Working Group and the Kenya Police were instrumental in […]]]>

A male dog from the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) on November 30, 2009 sniffs some of the ivory and skins of wild animals he helped seize from poachers across the country during a press briefing at the KWS headquarters in Nairobi. The KWS, the Lusaka Accord Working Group and the Kenya Police were instrumental in the success of a coordinated Interpol operation against poachers. Since its launch three months ago, the operation has resulted in the seizure in Kenya of only 567.8 kilograms of carved and raw ivory objects. AFP PHOTO / SIMON MAINA. (Photo credit should read SIMON MAINA / AFP / Getty Images)

Despite evidence showing that wildlife crime is linked to other forms of serious crime, most countries have wildlife policies and legislation that do not address poaching and wildlife trafficking. as a serious offense. Due to weak laws, perpetrators of wildlife crimes are never profiled despite their despicable acts of illegal logging and wildlife trafficking.
It is in this response that 30 representatives of Ethiopia’s wildlife protection and law enforcement institutions gather in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for a three-day training on justice and prosecution. . Convened by the Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Authority (EWCA), the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), the training will enhance participants’ skills in detection, treatment and adjudication of wildlife cases in the country.
The training is part of a two-year program, funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs and led by IUCN NL (Netherlands National Committee), which is committed to preventing and combating species crime wild in the countries of the Horn of Africa in South Sudan. , Kenya, Uganda, Somalia, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Sudan. The Horn of Africa is emerging as a major region of wildlife crime, both as a source and transit route for illicit wildlife products, mainly ivory, rhino horn , skins of wild animals and live animals.
“Effective law enforcement is one of the important ways to end illegal logging and trafficking in wildlife,” said Henk Simons, senior nature conservation expert at the Dutch National Committee for the IUCN NL. “Other strategies that we focus on in our program are cross-border cooperation and the active engagement of local communities in preventing and combating wildlife crime. “
“Wildlife offenses have become more sophisticated and involve organized crime, weapons and customs offenses. Therefore, there is a need to strengthen all actors in the justice system in the fight against wildlife crime, ”said Ato Girma Timer, Director of Wildlife Protected Areas Development and Protection at EWCA.
Mr. Girma, who officially opened the training on behalf of the EWCA Director General, Mr. Dawud Mume, added: “The training will be fruitful as it has focused on important topics related to cash crime. wild and is provided to the professionals concerned.
Species conservation actors attribute weak enforcement of wildlife laws to the lack of monitoring mechanisms for wildlife crimes. However, insufficient personnel and equipment capacities remain an obstacle to accelerating efforts to reduce threats to the long-term survival of Africa’s iconic species. Elephants, rhinos, great apes and large carnivores are among the species most threatened by illegal killing and trafficking in Ethiopia.
Dr Philip Muruthi, vice president for species conservation at AWF, observed that tackling wildlife crime involves interagency and regional collaboration among other efforts. “Such partnerships improve the effectiveness of illegal interceptions of wildlife products at airports, seaports and border points, they also strengthen criminal prosecutions against wildlife and enable law enforcement in major landscapes. “Said Dr Muruthi.
“Appropriate case management and punitive sentences for wildlife crimes are an essential part of the arrest, investigation, court process and conviction of wildlife criminals,” said James Isiche, Director IFAW East Africa Regional. “This training aims to ensure that judicial and prosecution personnel are well equipped with the capacities required to prosecute wildlife law violators and propose dissuasive penalties,” added Isiche.
Activities during the training include a rapid analysis of Ethiopia’s wildlife policies and laws, and deliberations of stakeholders on their roles and contributions in combating wildlife crime, gaps in legislation on wildlife. wildlife law enforcement and weaknesses in investigations and prosecutions.


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